First Minister spells it out for Daily Mail reporter, aged 12?

May thanks to reader Bob Lamont for capturing this sharp and informative, only slightly exasperated, response to a question of unsurpassed thickness, even from the Daily Mail.

The FM, like a skilled primary teacher gets right down to his level and, frankly, ‘tears him a new one.

It’s really worth showing to any floating voters you know to counter BBC Scotland’s misleading tendency to ignore borrowing powers and imply once more that Westminster would be helping us out.

25 thoughts on “First Minister spells it out for Daily Mail reporter, aged 12?

  1. There is a staggering ignorance in many Scots as to how governments fund their programs.
    I have heard from quite a few people that it is just as well Scotland isn’t independent right now as we would be unable to fund furlough payments.
    We have to find a way to dumb down the explanation of how governments “borrow” for the benefit of the Mail readers.
    States do not operate finances in the same way as grocer shops which is what the MSM would try to have us believe.
    Musn’t have the plebs finding out what is really going on.

    Liked by 4 people

  2. Excellent response from the FM.
    I managed to view this clip from Bob’s initial post, I can also view it from above. . . However I cannot view it directly from the youtube platform.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. Perhaps because I’m subscribed it throws a wobbly, I really don’t know…
      Try looking it up on YouTube, so far as I’m aware Indyref Two is a publicly available channel…

      Like

  3. Right-wing rag employee asks daft question.

    Did he ask a daft question because he works for a gutter rag?
    Or because he sees the world through a simplistic lens?

    Perhaps the person and the paper are well suited to each other, and asking stupid stuff enhances his value to the said rag.

    Liked by 2 people

  4. This is the same approach that DRoss has every time he croaks a question in Holyrood – ”Why doesn’t the FM spend more money on my donors’ businesses ? ”
    It beggars belief the lack of understanding /ignorance among the opposition at Holyrood .
    Starwars and Coal-scuttle and Dross keep insisting that ”money” be found for every topic that THEY say is a crisis – yet they NEVER suggest which Peter the FM is going to rob to pay Paul !

    Liked by 2 people

    1. It’s not ignorance or lack of understanding these troughers know exactly what is what re finances, and the ‘budget’ and ‘grant’ they just hope that most people watching and reading the so called ‘media’ do not a scoobie about it all.

      Economics should be taught in schools as soon as kids can count far as I am concerned, teach them about where their parents’ taxes go, and of course in Scotland’s case, maybe when they go to High school, teach them about what the ‘block grant’ actually is and what it means for their country. Whats the point in teaching numbers/maths if young folk have no idea about how a country operates economically, or how a government spends their parents’ taxes etc…

      Liked by 3 people

    2. That’s the giveaway to this all being scripted and coordinated – They can’t all be quite as dumb to be thinking the same exact thing despite it being false…
      Dross, the BBC, now the Daily Fail.. Nah…

      Liked by 1 person

  5. I missed all that,so thanks John,as the saying goes they don’t like it up them.They are all the same anything to run down Scotland and they are well served by the likes of Dross and Sarwet.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. With a circulation of 69,000, the ‘Scottish’ Daily Mail is hardly a loud voice. I remember a time when I worked in local papers with a bigger reach.!

    Liked by 2 people

  7. Except that Modern Monetary Theory (actually not a theory, but simply a description of how modern finance works) as propounded by such enlightened economists such as Professors Stephanie Kelton, Richard Murphy and others says this. A sovereign government with its own currency need never borrow. It can create currency to pay for things by a few keystrokes on a computer and hey presto the money is brought into existence. As per the quantitative easing which went into bailing out the banks, supporting furlough, paying the frightful Dido Harding to create a track and trace system that doesn’t work, etc. There is no shortage of currency and creating it does not, per se, cause inflation. All the above things were paid for by new money which the Westminster government instructed the Bank of England to create. The money did not exist before it was created and its creation has not caused any inflation.

    Liked by 5 people

    1. Glad to see someone mention this. Why do SNP always refer to borrowing, is it to try to equate Government to running a business?

      Like

      1. Perhaps because so many swallowed Maggie’s “family budget” scam ?
        A great many people adopted this horse manure as gospel, trying to “gently” nudge them to a completely different perspective 40 odd years later when Sunak et al are still trying to keep the lie alive could be catastrophic for Indy (I don’t understand etc.)

        Borrowing during hard times is universally understood, resetting financial perspectives can follow, ie use the language folks understand…

        Liked by 2 people

        1. I tend to agree with you, even though it grates on me when I know we really need Independence and our own currency so that we can do all the things necessary to make our country successful. Thank goodness there are people like Dr Tim Rideoit and the Scottish Currency Group pushing this forward.

          Liked by 1 person

          1. To all those from David Howdle’s 1st post and later.
            I agree with you about MMT. I am reading Stephanie Kelton’s book “The Deficit Myth” (if you havent got it, ask Santa), but what we need to remember is that the notion that issuers of sovereign currency can get themselves out of jail by just printing a bit more dosh (actually with a few key strokes) is, given past history, highly contended. Moreover, expressed that way its a bit simplistic.
            If we look at now – right now – inflation is higher than it has been for some time. There are clear labour shortages in parts of the economy. Kelton explains that this is not the time to be printing more money. In some ways it’s rather like Keynesianism – that the government keeps printing money until inflation indicates that the economy is nearing its capacity. In the same way, Keynes argued in Employment, Interest and Money that the government should spend to absorb the unused resources in the economy, in his case primarily labour (writing as he did immediately after the Depression).
            Why would inflation be rising? Well one reason is that the capacity of the economy to produce has been limited by Covid, rather in the same way that the throughput of the NHS has been limited. For instance, the capacity of the supply chain (or distribution as we used to know it) has been reduced by shortages of labour. It is almost tradition to blame this on Brexit, and to some extent that is right, but it seems to be happening all over Europe at least. Whatever the cause, I would argue that the capacity of the productive economy to produce has been negatively affected by the virus – people more cautious, working from home etc. It is though clear from Kelton’s argument that even an MMT convert would be unlikely to argue for putting more money into the economy, unless of course we want more inflation.
            Moreover, there are commanding heights of society that just aren’t ready to accept MMT – in that group we can include the European Commission (which with the Euro has removed from sovereign countries the right to issue sovereign money),the President of the United States and the Conservative Party.
            I think we need to appreciate we are in a hard place. As Omicron does its damage, our focus should not be on who is in hospital (or not only that) but how many folk are off their work because of it. A somewhat apocalyptic example that I wouldnt expect to come about, but it makes the point, is imagine if all the guys who worked in the control room of National Grid went down with it. Ouch!
            At the same time, Johnson is clearly in trouble with his own backbenchers determined that we should all regain our personal freedoms and to hell with vaccine passports , social distancing, and trying to prevent folk from having parties if they want to (Birthday card – “It’s my party and I’ll lie if I want to”). This of course, if people act on it, will increase the rate of infection. There wont be much point in saying three weeks later we got it wrong because by then the damage has been done. In that regard Frost’s resignation is a bad sign. It’s not that I have any time for the guy who strikes me as a blustering bully, but, he is reported to have “been vocal in recent weeks about his concerns over tax increases and the reimposition of Covid restrictions. He is understood to have spoken out against a rise in national insurance to pay for health and social care spending.”
            So, if he represents the core thinking of those who would unseat our blessed PM, it’s clear minimal protections against Covid, no more spending to support anything approaching lockdown, and a low tax, and as he put it, an”entrepreneurial economy”.
            According to more than one paper, his resignation is emblematic of the opening up of fissures in the Tory Party, and maybe so. But such policies are going to increase the gaps between the four nations of the UK to a yawning chasm.
            We have all had good fun taking the mick out of BoJo, but as the old saying goes “Be careful what you wish for, you just might get it”. You know like Gove, Truss, Patel, Sunak …….

            Liked by 2 people

            1. Thanks for your very full response. I agree that the question is a complex one. It needs someone like Prof Kelton to make sense of it and it takes a whole book! I have her book so am asking Santa for something else this year.
              For me the point is that on independence the Scottish government needs to have its own currency practically from the word go in order to survive as an independent nation. If we don’t have that we are still going to be dependent on Westminster and the money markets. If we have our own currency we can pull our own financial levers and make our own decisions about whether and when to create more currency and whether and when to borrow. Without it we are still going to be nothing more than a glorified county council, dependent on financial decisions made in London.

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              1. David I agree with almost everything that you say. My “target” when I wrote that “can get themselves out of jail by just printing a bit more dosh” was highly simplistic, I was actually talking about right now. BoJo’s problem is that his party is s******g itself about the level of indebtedness, and indeed it doesnt seem as if much has changed in the Tory Party, for Sunak is still making noises about repaying it all.
                What makes it even more difficult that with inflation going up – which is one of the signs of having to reign in spending that even Kelton agrees with – is becoming an issue. On the other hand, do we either let Covid rip through the community or flush the economy down the toilet?
                As for Scotland, I agree with the proposition of a currency at least very early in independence. I mean 5-10 years is for the birds. Just stupid. On the other hand, I am open to the argument that setting up a new country is a big ask, so anything that could be kicked down the road – even by a year or two – is a good thing. I think that is the moot – putting our own currency in place right away and adding to the complications there will be; OR leaving it for (say) a year, sucking up the problems but getting some of the other complications resolved.

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                1. Alasdair, my concern is that we should, as a country, be putting in place the infrastructure and the policies that we intend to adopt after a successful indy vote. And the government should be explaining to people why they are intending to have this policy rather than that and why they intend to go this way rather than that. I could be wrong, but I don’t see any sign of that happening.
                  I fear that we risk squandering the advantage of swift, decisiive action after an indy vote. And if we stick with the growth commission policies we shall remain in thrall to Westminster.

                  Like

            2. Interesting thoughts, iamsoccerdoc. I must get her book too, I’ve been meaning to for some time, here is a clip of Kelton giving her view on the current inflationary phase

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                1. It shows up as a picture of Stephanie Kelton with the Play button > just click and video should play in YouTube. I posted my comment in WordPress and just checked it separately in my browser, it’s showing in both. Hope you can see it.

                  Like

  8. Who is the Fool here
    1.The Daily Mail Scibbler
    Or
    2. The owner who funds and pays his salary
    Answer Both so Q.
    But who is the larger of the Fool
    Answer.
    Impossible to calc.
    But they certainly deserve one another
    Maybe just a marriage made in Hell

    Liked by 2 people

  9. It was Indyref Two who featured the clip, where I’d commented “To be fair to Blackley, he is only following the same script as the BBC in Scotland, Juan Kerr and DRoss have been for the last fortnight at least….”

    What made it all the more comic was Blackley doubling down on it being a legitimate question and getting support from the usual muppets led by Sub-Lt RN (failed) Bowie as Harrumph/Smirker in chief in a National article.
    https://www.thenational.scot/news/19793677.nicola-sturgeon-covid-briefing-row-response-daily-mail-journalists/

    Liked by 4 people

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