Hospital-acquired Covid infections fall to 0.1%

Figure 1 is an epidemic curve of COVID-19 cases with first positive specimen taken during an inpatient stay. The length of the bars are the counts of COVID-19 cases during each week, from week ending 1 March 2020 to week ending 18 July 2021, with the bars broken down by hospital onset status: non-hospital onset (day 1 or 2 of in-patient stay), indeterminate hospital onset, probable hospital onset and definite hospital onset. The chart shows a steep increase in overall cases and definite hospital onset cases until a peak on week ending 5 April 2020. This is followed by a decline in overall cases and definite hospital onset cases since this peak; few cases were observed during July and August 2020. A subsequent increase was observed in overall and definite hospital onset cases from week ending 30 August 2020, plateauing towards the end of 2020, followed by a further increase in overall and definite hospital onset cases from week ending 3 January 2021 to a peak on week ending 17 January 2021. After the peak in January 2021, there was a decline in overall and definite hospital onset cases. Since the week ending 13 June 2021, a slight increase has been observed in hospital onset cases.
https://www.publichealthscotland.scot/publications/hospital-onset-covid-19-cases-in-scotland/hospital-onset-covid-19-cases-in-scotland-week-ending-1-march-2020-to-week-ending-18-july-2021/

According to Public Health Scotland’s most recent report, in the week-ending 18th July, 13 758 cases of Covid were acquired in the community and 18 were picked up in hospital wards.

The Scottish Conservatives health spokesperson, Miles Briggs, is expected to demand an apology from the Health Secretary, Humza Yousaf.

BBC Scotland’s health correspondent, Lisa Smithers, has been too tired to report these data since November 2020:

NHS England have solved their problems with such infections by just not publishing any data, but in April 2021, when the level of hospital onset Covid infection in Scotland had fallen to nearly zero, former English Health Minister, Jeremy Hunt, reported that it was around 15% in English hospitals:

Figure 1 is an epidemic curve of COVID-19 cases with first positive specimen taken during an inpatient stay. The length of the bars are the counts of COVID-19 cases during each week, from week ending 1 March 2020 to week ending 18 July 2021, with the bars broken down by hospital onset status: non-hospital onset (day 1 or 2 of in-patient stay), indeterminate hospital onset, probable hospital onset and definite hospital onset. The chart shows a steep increase in overall cases and definite hospital onset cases until a peak on week ending 5 April 2020. This is followed by a decline in overall cases and definite hospital onset cases since this peak; few cases were observed during July and August 2020. A subsequent increase was observed in overall and definite hospital onset cases from week ending 30 August 2020, plateauing towards the end of 2020, followed by a further increase in overall and definite hospital onset cases from week ending 3 January 2021 to a peak on week ending 17 January 2021. After the peak in January 2021, there was a decline in overall and definite hospital onset cases. Since the week ending 13 June 2021, a slight increase has been observed in hospital onset cases.

3 thoughts on “Hospital-acquired Covid infections fall to 0.1%

  1. If your next article is the headline is “fake news risking lives for a story” then this is, at the very least twisted news risking lives for a story.

    Irresponsible at best and if it isn’t, at worst, criminal it should be.

    Like

  2. Because the figure – 0.1% – is so low, perhaps BBC Scotland could try the line that it is the ‘worst in Britain’ since the figure for England is 15%??

    Efter a’, since maist ae us went tae crap state schuilis we don’t know aonythin aboot staststics, or whitever you cry thum. It’s a stupit wurd tha!

    Like

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