Campus outbreaks were few and short-lived

You’ll remember the opposition parties/media pals feeding frenzy on the Covid outbreaks in student accomodation.

Today with little fuss, the First Minister offered a little perspective.

The outbreaks were quickly suppressed by the early days of October with two thirds of them in a three week period from the end of September.

There have been no major outbreaks since then.

Three quarters of the cases were in Edinburgh and Glasgow and most of this in only two locations: Pollock Halls in Edinburgh, and the Murano Halls in Glasgow.

It was never much of a story.

3 thoughts on “Campus outbreaks were few and short-lived”

  1. BUT UNIONISTS THOUGHT THEY HAD HIT GOLD
    AND COULD REALLY GET TORE INTO SNP GOV

    THIS FROM SO-CALLED EDUCATED WALLIES
    OR SHOULD CALL THEM. AGENT PROVOCATEURS

    ENEMIES OF THE STATE

    Liked by 2 people

  2. In addition the media were blaming the students for the outbreak, rather than the real villains – the University authorities and the owners of the student residences. Anyone who has ever lived in students residences knows how difficult it is to distance physically at the best of times. So, to have the halls as full as normal was likely to facilitate the spread. Many student courses could have continued on line, meaning that fewer were on campus, leaving more space for those whose courses required specialised accommodation.

    This was rapacious greed for fees and rents.

    Liked by 5 people

  3. from

    Click to access 9th-December-2020-COG-UK-Report-Scotland-SARS-CoV-2-a-genomics-perspective-SAGE.pdf

    The second wave -relative contribution of imports to lineages in SeptemberAn estimate of the relative contribution of the imported lineages to the subsequent circulation in Scotland was made by considering which UK lineages were imported in the time periods 17th July to 30th August (summer) and 30th August onwards (autumn), and the number of sequences within those lineages in Scotland versus the total number of sequences in Scotland counting from 17th July onwards for summer imports, or 30th August onwards for autumn imports. Supplementary table 3 shows the summary per lineage origin location, and Supplementary tables 4 and 5 show the details of the top summer and autumn imported lineages.There were 2882 sequences collected from Scotland from 17th July onwards, and of the 46 lineages which had an inferred origin outside Scotland timed between 17th July and 30th August, these lineages resulted in 763 sequences in Scotland, so overall it is estimated that imported lineages over the summer contributed to 26% of sequences from the summer onwards. Interestingly, by this measure it was imports from Europe (16%) rather than England (8%) that contributed more to the subsequent number of Scottish sequences over the summer and onwards. While, in the autumn, there were 1686 sequences collected from Scotland from 30th August onwards, and of the nine lineages which had an inferred origin outside Scotland timed as 30th August and onwards, these lineages resulted in 18 sequences in Scotland. So overall it is estimated that imported lineages over the autumn only contributed to 1% of sequences from the autumn onwards. Of this 1% the majority of the sequences in these lineages had an English origin.

    A THIRD of the imported virus lineages in the “2nd wave” came from England but of course ABC tries to emphasise the European component.

    Liked by 1 person

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