Increases in deaths above the average for the last five years are known as ‘excess deaths’ – and include both deaths from Covid-19 and other conditions.

From anandprasad

In the Sun, country wide comparison of extra deaths. https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/11542171/englands-excess-death-rate-highest-europe-coronavirus/


The Financial Times does a great graph of this but not of the UK countries
https://www.ft.com/content/a26fbf7e-48f8-11ea-aeb3-955839e06441

The Sun data comes from here: https://www.euromomo.eu/graphs-and-maps/

Z-scores:
England: peak 43.5 in week 15, now 31.52 in week 18
Scotland: peak at 15.65 in week 15, now 5.82 in week 18
NI peak 8.8 in week 15, now -1.1 in week 18
Wales peak 19.76 in week 15, now 2.44 in week 18

Z-score (y axis of Sun graph) defined as:
Z-scores are used to standardize series and enable comparison mortality pattern between different populations or between different time periods. The standard deviation is the unit of measurement of the z-score. It allows comparison of observations from different normal distributions.

In general, Z-score = (x-mean of the population)/Standard deviation of the population, which could be approximated in our context by S-score = (number of deaths – baseline) / Standard deviation of the residuals (variation of the number of deaths around the baseline) on the part of the series used to fit the model, used as the standard unit.

Where England has a z-score of 43.5 at its peak, in Denmark and Ireland the extra deaths are not noticeable.
Denmark had 2.34 at its peak in week 14 and is now 1.16 (it was much higher in Oct 2018 at 7.35).
Ireland has hardly deviated from the mean at all. It was highest in November last year before the outbreak (and even higher in Feb 2018 and Feb 2017) and is now well below the mean at minus 1.58