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From Panelbase for the Sunday Times on 3rd July 2020:

32% of those living in Scotland but born in England would vote Yes compared to 56% of those born in Scotland.

35% of those living in Scotland but born in England would vote SNP compared to 58% of those born in Scotland. 25% would vote Conservative compared to 19% of those born in Scotland.

These are significant differences but smaller than I would have guessed given the evidence that this group played a big part in the No vote in 2014:

Click to access 2014_referendum_2014_%E2%80%93_how_rural_scotland_voted.pdf

23% of those living in Scotland but born in England think Boris Johnson is doing a good job in his response to the Covid-19 outbreak compared to 21% of those born in Scotland.

67% of those living in Scotland but born in England think Nicola Sturgeon is doing a good job in his response to the Covid-19 outbreak compared to 75% of those born in Scotland.

These seem quite minor differences, smaller than those between gender and age groups. There is for example a 13% difference in approval of Nicola Sturgeon between younger and older women and a 9% difference in approval of Boris Johnson between younger women (14%) and younger men (23%). That last one’s a bit of a shocker.

https://www.drg.global/wp-content/uploads/Sunday-Times-tables-for-publication-060720.pdf

In 2018:

Nearly two years earlier, again from Panelbase for the Sunday Times on the 4th October 2018:

26% of those living in Scotland but born in England would vote Yes compared to 46% of those born in Scotland.

So, over these two years we see a 23% increase in Yes support among those born in England.

21% of those living in Scotland but born in England would vote SNP compared to 41% of those born in Scotland. 43% would vote Conservative compared to 24% of those born in Scotland.

So, over these two years we see a large increase in SNP support (66%) and fall in Conservative support (42%) among those born in England.

Intriguingly two years ago, the English-born were more in favour or retaining the right to smack weans or bairns at 60% to 53%.

Both of these polls had samples of more than 1 000.