In the Scotsman today from Shan Ross:

‘Nurses are undervalued in both status and pay because the majority are women, a new study finds. Experts warn the UK will continue to experience severe nursing shortages if pay is not improved. Experts warn the UK will continue to experience severe nursing shortages if pay is not improved. The study, commissioned by the Royal College of Nursing and carried out by the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) and Oxford University.’

Is this UK study really just an English study? I know it can be difficult for those highly qualified researchers at Oxford to tell the difference. Did they or you think of checking the situation in Scotland? The full 90 page report (via link below) mentions Scotland only 3 times but does not anywhere refer to differences in pay and conditions:

https://rcni.com/nursing-standard/newsroom/news/old-fashioned-view-of-nursing-feminine-undervalues-profession-rcn-study-reveals-157361

Oh, OK, I’ll do it then. See this:

By 2020/21, Scottish staff will be significantly better paid than NHS staff anywhere else in the UK. For example, relative to staff in England:

  • Pay for a porter at the top of Band 2 will be over £1,200 more
  • Pay for a healthcare assistant at the top of Band 3 will be over £1,450 more
  • Pay for a healthcare support worker at the top of Band 4 will be over £800 more
  • Pay for a ward nurse at the top of Band 5 will be over £1,030 more
  • Pay for a paramedic at the top of Band 6 will be nearly £1,280 more
  • Pay for an advanced nurse practitioner at the top of Band 7 will be over £1,500 more

The four areas of reform to terms and conditions are: sickness absence policy; organisational change and future protection of earnings; policy on time off for those who have worked additional hours and appraisal and career progression.

https://www.gov.scot/news/9-percent-pay-rise-for-nhs-workers/

Looking on the bright side, the Scotsman’s regular health correspondent will be chuffed that the new girl is showing such promise in lumping Scotland in with UK crises.